An entry-level technician repairs an A/C unit as part of his HVAC job interview

Trade School Tips: Preparing for HVAC Interview

Imagine this: You’ve just discovered an exciting job opening, and you want to apply. Or maybe you’ve already applied and have scheduled an interview! Now what? How should you prepare? Get ready to ace your entry-level A/C and Refrigeration interview with these helpful tips, HVAC question and answers, and general advice from the Apex Technical School team.

Practice A/C and Refrigeration Job Interview Questions

HVAC interview date circled on a calendar in black inkMost job interviews begin with general questions. General questions give you a chance to demonstrate your personality and work ethic—two important considerations that will help the interviewer decide if you’re a good fit for the role and the company culture. Some general questions include:

  • Tell me about yourself.
  • Why do you want to work in the HVAC field?
  • What do you know about this company?
  • Tell me about your education/certification and what you learned.
  • What are some skills you’ve gained at other jobs or at school that you feel you could use in this position?

As your meeting progresses, the nature of the interview questions changes too. You may notice that the interviewer asks more technical questions the longer your conversation lasts. This is normal! Technical questions are your chance to shine by communicating your skills and confidence in the HVAC trade. You may want to prepare answers for these common technical questions:

  • Can you describe the A/C, refrigeration systems and appliances you have worked on and are most familiar with?
  • Tell me about an HVAC problem or challenge you couldn’t solve. What did you do to find a solution?
  • If you saw a coworker making a mistake or being unsafe, what would you do?

Lastly, what do you want to know about the company or role you’re interviewing for? Brainstorm a few questions when you’re preparing for your interview. Keep these in the back of your mind or write them down on a sheet of paper that you bring with you to your interview. This shows you’ve taken initiative to envision yourself in the position and that you’re serious about the job. Some questions you might ask the interviewer are:

  • Are there opportunities for training or advancement within this role?
  • What is the biggest challenge the company is facing right now, and why?
  • What would a successful person be doing in this role two months from now? Six months from now? A year from now?
  • What do you like most about working here?

What to Wear to an HVAC Job Interview

If you’re unsure what to wear to an HVAC interview, you’re not alone. Many individuals who are interviewing for their first entry-level position question what’s appropriate attire. A good rule of thumb? Dress one step up from what the job would require. Since HVAC jobs typically require work clothes and boots, that clothing may not always be right for the interview.

Instead, boost your professionalism one step by wearing casual business attire for your interview. This may look like an ironed button-down shirt, khaki pants (not jeans) and dress shoes. Depending on the company and if you’ll be customer-facing in your role, you could choose to wear a tie to the interview as well. Always maintain good hygiene.

Related: What Is the Refrigerant Certification for HVAC Technicians?

What to Bring to an HVAC Job Interview

A technician holds A/C refrigeration equipment and answers HVAC questions

Before you leave home for your interview empty-handed, plan what you may need to bring. It’s a good idea to ask the interviewer ahead of time if they’ll require you to install or repair equipment as part of the interview process. If so, bring your toolbox to the interview with a few basic tools:

  • Screwdrivers
  • Pliers
  • Hammer
  • Tape measure
  • Multimeter
  • Wrench

In addition to tools, it’s a good idea to bring extra copies of your resume inside a clean folder. Don’t assume the interviewer already has a copy. Plus, if they decide to bring another employee to ask you questions at the interview, you’ll have extra copies for that additional person. You may also want to bring a list of references, or people you know professionally who can speak to your character, work ethic and skills—such as former bosses, instructors or coworkers.

 

Now, you’re ready to knock your HVAC interview out of the park and be on your way toward an exciting career path! If you’re an Apex HVAC student who needs help with your resume or interview preparation, reach out to our job placement assistance team. We’re here and ready to help you!

 

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

A pipefitter who went to plumbing school uses a wrench on pipes under a sink

Why Learn Plumbing Skills at a Trade School?

Almost every building in America requires access to water and plumbing. People in offices, hospitals, schools, government buildings and residential homes rely on flowing water for necessary daily tasks—from hygiene to cooking to watering the garden and much more. Skilled plumbers and pipefitters must be called in to keep all these pipes in working order.

If you’re interested in pursuing plumbing and pipefitting training, you may be wondering if trade classes are worth it. We’ll break down the benefits of hands-on technical training to help you decide a path that’s right for you.

Is Plumbing a Good Career Path?

A plumber, lying under a kitchen sink, makes repairs with a variety of plumbing toolsPlumbers install reliable and long-lasting parts, troubleshoot problems, maintain existing pipework and appliances. They also stay up-to-date on the latest trends, such as environmentally and economically friendly options for homeowners and contractors. Such an important trade keeps America running smoothly and can offer hands-on individuals a path to a fulfilling career as a plumber or pipefitter.

Some individuals enroll in plumbing classes because they don’t like working 9–5 at a desk job. They don’t feel productive or accomplished, or maybe they simply want to move around and use their hands to complete their work for the day. As a hands-on field, plumbing offers a way for aspiring plumbers to grow practical skillsets without being tied to a desk.

Plumbing classes can introduce students to basic plumbing and pipefitting methods and tools that they can use on jobs once they enter the field. Students also benefit from structured, safety-focused learning environments, such as a realistic shop setting, where they can ask questions and practice skills alongside instructors and peers. These experiences can give students skills and confidence that they may use in a plumbing career.

Benefits of Trade School for Plumbing

There are many positive reasons to begin plumbing classes at Apex Technical School if you want to pursue a hands-on career in plumbing and pipefitting. Top reasons include:

  • Hands-on training opportunities
  • Introduction to hand and power tools, fixtures, faucets, fittings, DWV piping and valves
  • Dedicated instructors
  • Classroom and shop learning environments
  • Safety knowledge
  • Practice using tools and equipment of the trade
  • Job placement assistance
  • Supportive school staff

Related: A Day in the Life of a Plumbing Student

Learn About the Plumbing Program at Apex

An Apex plumbing student learns to measure and cut copper pipes

The Admissions team at Apex is here to help you take the first step toward a future in plumbing and pipefitting! Plumbing classes are starting soon. Learn more about the Plumbing & Pipefitting program now, including what our instructors teach in the courses, or contact us to schedule a tour to see the campus, classrooms and shops.

 

 

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

A tradesman uses pliers at an electrician interview to cut electrical wires

Interview Tips for the Electrical Trade

Congratulations—you’re going to an entry-level electrician interview! This is an exciting time, and you’re probably eager to prepare for the big day. To help you be successful, we’ve assembled a few tips, electrician questions and answers, as well as some general advice. Keep reading to find all the information you need to boost your confidence and professionalism!

Practice Electrician Job Interview Questions

Ensure you’re prepared to excel at your interview by practicing electrician questions and answers. When you know what to expect, you can feel more confident about yourself, your skills, the job you’re applying for and the nature of the electrical work you’ll discuss with your potential employer. In addition to electrical interview questions, here are other questions that can help you prepare.

Brush up on interview questions for an electrician with these sample questions:

  • Tell me about yourself.
  • Why do you want this job?
  • Tell me about your education/certification and what you learned.
  • Can you describe the electrical systems you have worked on and are most familiar with?
  • Please describe some recent projects you worked on in detail.
  • Tell me about an electrical problem or challenge you couldn’t solve. What did you do to find a solution?
  • If you saw a coworker making a mistake or being unsafe, what would you do?

Finally, don’t leave the interview without asking the employer a couple of questions about the position or company. Asking questions at an electrical interview shows your passion—as well as your interest and seriousness in the role. It also gives you a good idea what it would be like to work in the role. You want to make sure you’re a good fit for them, and that they’re a good fit for you. Ask questions like, “What do you enjoy most about working here?” or “What would a successful candidate in this role be doing a year from now?”

What to Wear to an Electrician Job Interview

A green circle around the 15th day of the month indicates an electrician job interview

How do you want to present yourself at your job interview? Physical appearance is a priority, and it’s a good idea to wear professional clothing, such as business attire. This might mean a button-down shirt, ironed slacks (not jeans), dress shoes (leave the boots at home) and a belt.

Your appearance can say a lot about you. For instance, if you wear a full suit to your interview, the employer may get the impression that you’re not ready for hands-on electrical work. That’s why clean, pressed business attire is more likely the ideal choice for an entry-level electrician interview. Neat clothing and good hygiene go a long way.

What to Bring to an Electrician Job Interview

A tradesman demonstrates his skills after answering electrician interview questions

Find out ahead of time if you’ll be required to perform electrical tasks at the interview. The employer may want to see you test your knowledge by working on an install or repair project. If you’ll be required to complete tasks on site, you might prepare yourself by bringing:

  • Pliers
  • Wire strippers
  • Digital multimeter
  • Electrical tape
  • Screwdriver

If you aren’t required to demonstrate your skills at your electrician interview, there are still a few things you don’t want to leave at home. Make sure to bring an extra copy of your resume, as well as a positive, polite attitude. A list of references—or people who can speak to your abilities, education and character—can also be handy in case the employer wants to confirm details on your resume after the interview ends.

 

Are you an Apex student who is interested in job placement assistance, such as help with your resume? Our job placement team is here to help! Reach out to us today—we’re happy to support you.

 

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

Hammers, wrenches, scissors and pliers lie on a wooden work bench in a carpenter's shop

History of Woodworking Tools

Humans began fashioning and using tools as early as 2.6 million years ago. In the Stone Age, ancient peoples turned stones into basic tools such as hammers and axes, and they also leveraged sharp animal bones in more advanced toolmaking. These early tools were used for hunting and survival, but they paved the way for hand tools that helped early humans build shelters and other structures.

Some of the most important hand tools throughout history have included the knife, hammer, hand saw, and plane. Keep reading to learn the background of several of these hand tools, which are still used today in the carpentry and building trade.

History of the Hammer

Two carpenters use a hammer to place nails on a boardThe hammer as we know it today consists of a handle and a head usually made of iron. But the earliest hammers began as only a granite hammer head, which was used to break stones into smaller pieces of flint. Over time, humans added the handle using a string of leather or vine for more control and precision.

Around 2000 to 1800 BC, hammers began to be made for specific jobs, such as blacksmithing, mining and carpentry. For centuries, tradesmen have improved very little upon the basic function of the hammer while also adjusting it for specialized uses such as soft-faced mallets, dead blow hammers and more. Hammers today often have a claw feature on the head, which carpenters and other tradespeople use to extract nails and remove boards.

It’s very common for most carpentry, construction or building jobs to have multiple types of hammers on site. In fact, students at Apex carry a hammer in their toolbox as part of the Construction & Building Skills program. This ancient and simple tool used for woodworking is still critical to the trades today.

Handsaws and Their Evolution

Experts aren’t sure when the first handsaw was invented. The knife paved the way for scissors, as well as for the handsaw. After all, a handsaw is a knife with sharp teeth on the edge that ancient humans used to cut materials like wood more efficiently. Egyptian texts show that a type of handsaw was used to help build the pyramids before 1500 BC. By the 17th century, handsaws were more readily available because blacksmiths could more easily produce them.

Specialty saws emerged in the 1800s, such as the compass saw, the ripsaw, the pitsaw and the cross-cut saw. Manufacturers produced saws that were used to help build structures. These saws had sloped, rounded edges and flat, rectangular edges. Today’s handsaws don’t look much different than the handsaws of the 1800s.

Now, many carpenters and construction workers use saws with plastic handles and removable blades that are both rust resistant and thicker than the saws hundreds of years ago.

Related: Construction History Through the Centuries

Planes for Woodworking & Building

A carpenter uses a woodworking plane to smooth a piece of wood

The plane has existed for over 2,000 years and is a critical tool for craftsmen today. A plane, or a hand plane, is a tool for shaping wood using muscle power to force the cutting blade over the wood surface. Before the plane, early woodworkers likely used an adze, a stone and abrasive sand to roughly trim wood pieces.

Early examples of planes have been discovered in Rome, Britain and Germany, while the earliest known plane was excavated in Pompeii. Planes help carpenters and woodworkers remove rough surfaces and reduce a piece of wood down to the correct size for their structure. The main types of planes used in many woodshops today include:

  • Block planes – Used for minor cutting, shaping, or leveling corners
  • Smoothing planes – Used to remove fine shavings and create a smooth surface
  • Jack planes – Used as a general, all-purpose plane for sizing and smoothing
  • Jointer planes – Used to shave off large chunks and level surfaces
  • Bevel-up planes – Used to vary the cutting angle by altering the bevel angle
  • Joinery planes – Used to create joints

As the carpentry and building trade progresses, its tools will continue to evolve. Common tools today may be improved upon decades from now, to help construction workers, carpenters and builders become more efficient and precise in creating structures for customers.

 

Ready to step into the construction classroom and use carpentry tools in the shop at Apex? Learn more about the Construction & Building Skills program now.

 

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

A welder who followed simple interview tips demonstrates his welding skills

Interview Tips for the Welding Trade

If you’re working toward a future in welding, one of the first steps for an entry-level position is a welding job interview. For some people, interviews cause nervousness or anxiety. But they don’t have to—especially if you’re prepared ahead of time. Preparation leads to confidence, and confidence is one of the most important elements to a positive interview!

To help you prepare and learn how to get a welding job, we’ve compiled some first interview tips, including sample welding job interview questions you may be asked, what to wear to a welding job interview, and more.

What to Wear to a Welding Job Interview

In many industries, such as business, accounting or marketing, individuals who interview for job openings wear professional, tailored clothing and dress shoes. However, this attire isn’t always the right choice in the welding trade. If you’re interviewing for an entry-level welding position, you’ll likely be asked to perform a welding test as part of the interview process.

With this welding test in mind, consider wearing good quality work boots, a long-sleeve shirt and jeans to the interview. If you know a welding test isn’t involved in your first interview, consider wearing tailored clothing—such as slacks and a button-down shirt—to appear professional and polished.

Regardless of your clothing type, make sure your clothes fit well and are clean. An interview is a professional meeting, so cleanliness and polite manners go a long way toward a good first impression.

Related: Types of Welding Protective Gear

What to Bring to a Welding Job Interview

A hand circles a calendar date in red ink for a welding job interviewAnother first interview tip: ask the hiring manager if you’ll be required to perform a welding test at your interview. If the interviewer requires you to demonstrate your welding skills during the interview, you’ll want to bring several items with you so that you’re prepared with everything you need to succeed. Bring the following items:

  • Welding helmet
  • Welding gloves
  • Welding jacket
  • A chipping hammer
  • Grinder

It’s also recommended to bring a copy of your resume, which shows past welding experience, training and credentials you’ve earned. Bring a list of references, if possible. References are individuals who are willing and able to speak to your welding abilities, skills and personal character. They might be former employers, school instructors or community members who know you well. Lastly, bring a confident, positive mindset to your welding job interview.

Be Prepared to Demonstrate Your Skills

An individual performs a welding test at his welding job interviewIf you’re wondering how to get a welding job, the answer might be simpler than you think. Demonstrate your skills! In other words, as you’re preparing for your welding job interview, practice your welding approach. Practice increases your confidence and keeps your skills and knowledge fresh.

Many hiring managers will mention in the job posting the type of welding you’ll be required to do at the interview. MIG welding is often used for small-to-medium sized projects, while stick welding is commonly used for large structures and pipelines.

If you’re unsure of the type of welding required for the job, it’s a good idea to ask the hiring manager when they call to set up the interview. Asking for this detail gives you the opportunity to practice your skills and knowledge before it’s time to head to the interview.

Practice Welding Job Interview Questions

In addition to a welding test, your interviewer will likely ask you to answer several questions about yourself, the role you’re applying for and the nature of the work you’ll be doing. Here are some common questions you can anticipate hearing in your welding interview. Practice composing your answers to these and other questions, so you’ll be prepared to answer with confidence during your interview.

  • Tell me about yourself.
  • Why do you want this job?
  • Where did you receive your training?
  • Tell me about your education/certification and what you learned.
  • What would you do if you noticed an error in a colleague’s work?
  • Are you willing to learn new processes on the job?

At the end of the interview, you may be asked if you have any questions. It’s always a good idea to come prepared with two or three questions. This demonstrates your commitment and interest in the job position. You can ask questions about the position and the company or what the interviewer likes about working there—the answer may give you valuable insight into the company’s culture. With the right amount of preparation and practice, you can set yourself up for success.

 

Are you an Apex student who is interested in job placement assistance, such as help with your resume? Our job placement team is here to help! Reach out to us today—we’re happy to support you.

 

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

Welding sparks fly on a blue gradient background

Apex Student Spotlight: Garrett Hansen

We sat down with Apex Technical School graduate Garrett Hansen to ask him about his experience in the Combination Welding Technology program. Originally from Brewster, New York, Garrett currently lives in Brooklyn. Before pursuing a welding job, Garrett was a manager at a daycare for dogs.

Working Part-Time While Attending Classes

For Garrett, it was important to enroll in a trade program with class times during the day. Apex offers both day and evening classes.

“I came to Apex for my classes from 8 am–2 pm,” he said. “Then I worked at my part-time job from 3 pm–8 pm. It was tough but worth it.”

Garrett’s goal was to complete his courses as soon as possible, so he could graduate and start working in the welding field. Unlike traditional four-year universities and two-year community colleges, Apex’s programs can be completed in as little as 7 months.

“I moved through the welding program at my own pace and graduated in June 2022,” he said.

Hands-On Motivation

A student wearing a welding face shield completes a welding project during his Apex enrollmentSeveral elements about trade school kept Garrett motivated in the welding program. Most importantly, pursuing a trade gave Garrett the opportunity to be hands-on in the shop.

“I can’t sit behind a desk,” he said. “I need to be moving around.”

Garret knew that Apex offers an established welding program that could put him in a position to open doors to new opportunities.

“What led me to Apex was the welding program,” he said. “Welding is a good, stable career, and it’s something I enjoy doing. I also had a friend who graduated from Apex who got a job welding.”

Rewarding Experiences

Garrett had a positive experience at Apex—from interacting with instructors and staff to learning alongside other welding students.

“Instructors are helpful and the staff is great,” he said. “I feel the welding program is set up for us to be successful. I learned the skills required to become a great welder. I asked constant welding questions and got constant help. I had a good experience because welding is both challenging and rewarding. It is what you make of it.”

Tools of the Trade

Students like Garrett get to practice with real tools of the trade in a shop setting to get them ready for what it’s like to enter the field after completing their program.

“I felt supported by always having a place to learn with the resources I needed to succeed in welding,” he said. “I enjoyed learning the welding lingo during theory, then I got into the shop and we would do what we talked about.”

When asked about his favorite welding processes and equipment, Garrett didn’t hesitate.

“My favorite process is stick welding,” he said. “There’s something about the flux and feeding rod that makes me happy. My favorite piece of equipment is the cutting torch. It blasts through metal—that makes me excited. It’s thrilling!”

Related: MIG Welding and Other Common Welding Types

Challenges and Achievements

Apex Technical School building in Long Island City, Queens, New YorkSometimes students face milestones they never could have imagined. Looking back on his time in the welding program, Garrett remembers important moments.

“My biggest challenge was learning to be patient and understand that I’m learning,” he said. “I had to learn that I can’t get everything perfect on the first try. I’m most proud of coming to Apex every day and getting everything done at a good pace.”

Garrett also learned that his sense of satisfaction wasn’t achieved alone.

“One of my greatest achievements was being able to teach other students how to do things,” he said. “It gave me reassurance that I was learning it myself.”

Garrett also balanced coursework by not allowing himself to fall behind.

“I did everything right so I could quickly move on the next project,” he said. “For example, the night before a quiz, I made sure I studied.”

Apex Technical School Admissions Process

Looking back on his experience in the welding program, Garrett thinks it was the right path for him. He has simple advice for students considering enrolling at Apex: don’t be intimidated by the Apex Technical School admissions process.

“The admissions process was easy and quick,” he said. “It took one day, and I was signed up with a start date.”

If you’re interested in learning more about the Combination Welding Technology program or another program at Apex Technical School, explore our programs page. Classes are starting soon. Contact our admissions team online to get answers to your Apex enrollment or program questions. We’re excited to talk to you!

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

Wooden building blocks spelling out “financial help” on a wooden background

Financial Aid for Trade Schools

Education can be a stepping stone to the next phase of your future—both personally and professionally. For many individuals, the cost of school can be a hurdle. Financial aid makes it possible for students to more easily manage costs and pursue their goals—whether you’re interested in a trade school, community college, or traditional university.

Sticky notes on a desk showing “financial aid,” a graduation cap, and a bag of coinsFinancial aid is popular among students at two- and four-year universities. But trade school students often don’t realize that they could be eligible for financial aid, too. If you’re enrolling in trade school soon, keep reading to learn about financial aid options.

How to Pay for Trade School

There are several trade school financing options when it comes to paying for your education. We’ll break down your options, starting with the most popular—FAFSA:

  • FAFSA

    The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is a form completed by current and prospective students to determine their eligibility for federal student financial aid. To be considered for federal student loans, you must submit the FAFSA. Even if you don’t think you’ll qualify for financial aid, you’re encouraged to submit the FAFSA—you may be surprised by how much aid is available to eligible trade school students.

  • Federal Direct Student Loans

    This is a federal student loan program under which eligible students and parents borrow directly from the U.S. Department of Education at participating schools. Loans must be repaid—they are not free money from the federal government. Apex Technical School participates in this loan program.

  • Grants

    Grants are based upon financial need. Grants don’t need to be repaid. Examples of grants that trade school students may be eligible for include the Federal Pell Grant and the Federal SEOG Grant.

  • Federal Work-Study

    A limited number of part-time jobs are available through the Federal Work-Study program. Students must meet the basic eligibility requirements and have financial need. Work-study job placements are made once students begin classes.

  • Scholarships

    Check for scholarships in your community, at your church, your place of employment, and online.

Still curious about the types of financial aid and how they work? Learn more about federal student aid programs, including loans, grants, and work-study.https://apexschool.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/trade-school-financial-aid-FAFSA.jpg

Trade School Financial Aid at Apex

We understand financing options can seem confusing. That’s why we’re here to help explain it all and make applying as easy as possible. Our financial aid advisors will meet with you to help you understand and navigate the financial aid process. When you finish the application process, your financial aid advisor will prepare a financial aid package for you based upon your eligibility and financial need.

Your award package may include a combination of grants, loans, and other programs. Your advisor will be available to meet with you and talk through your aid, when you’ll receive it, billing and payment procedures, and more. Contact us today to find out if you’re eligible!

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

An HVAC technician repairs an air conditioning unit

Apex Student Spotlight: Jamil Williams

This month, we sat down with Jamil Williams, a trade school graduate of the Air Conditioning, Refrigeration & Appliance/Controls program at Apex Technical School. Jamil told us what he’s been up to since graduating from the program, what he liked about Apex, how he stayed motivated, what HVAC classes were his favorite, and much more.

Keep reading to learn about Jamil’s story—because his answers might surprise you!

Q&A with an Apex Graduate

Apex Technical: Can you tell us a little about yourself?

Jamil Williams: My name is Jamil Williams. I’m from Harlem, New York. I’m an Apex graduate, and I’m back taking AC Refrigeration refresher courses.

AT: Why did you decide to enroll in trade school?

JW: I was looking for a career change. I was working at sweetgreen. I felt I could do better than making salads, and I would overhear customers talking about their careers. That motivated me to do something different. I knew I could do better.

AT: How did you juggle other responsibilities and Apex’s HVAC training program at the same time?

JW: I took HVAC courses in the day program. That worked well for me, because it gave me time to go home to do what I had to do at home. It allowed me to be closer to my family.

AT: Other than the option for day or evening classes, what else helped you choose Apex?

A trade school graduate works on equipment with an Apex instructorJW: I found out about Apex from my counselor in high school. She mentioned Apex, and I remembered seeing the transit ads, and I knew it was a well-known school. I also have a thing for working with my hands—Lego, origami, classes on survival, basketball, robotics. Being hands-on always drew my attention.

AT: Sounds like trade school was the right fit!

JW: Yeah, I was motivated to go to trade school because, from my high school experience, I wanted to focus on one thing. In college you can take an HVAC program, but you would also have to take literature classes and do liberal arts. For me, that would be too much and a distraction. My family also does not have the money for college. My sister is enrolled in college, and she’s taken on a lot of debt.

AT: How were you able to focus on your goals?

JW: Apex set me up for success. It gave me multiple skills that I can use forever. The HVAC program kept me on track and focused. I learned how to be more responsible. For example, my instructors told me, “You can’t be late. It’s like a job.” Little things like that made a big impact and kept me accountable for my actions. Now I’m back for refresher classes, and it’s good practice—it’s getting me ready to go into the field. It makes me confident.

AT: What was your favorite class?

JW: Advanced Commercial Refrigeration/Air Conditioning. We had more systems in the class, package units, split units, compressors. The first time I got to fix an open hermetic compressor was in that class! You get to open it and see the mechanics of it. I learned how to wire four-way valves in a split unit system and how to use them correctly.

AT: What was the biggest challenge you overcame in your program?

JW: My biggest challenge was the passing the Section 608 Technician exam to earn my EPA certification. I initially only passed type 1 and type 2. I overcame this by studying the section I failed and taking a practice test at school and at home. My biggest achievement is my EPA universal. I found out through email about my test results. I saw the email early in the morning, I hopped out of bed, and screamed so loud—I was really hyped! My next priority was to focus on my fire guard. I’m now preparing for that.

AT: Did you feel supported by Apex?

JW: I felt supported by Apex because I got a lot of tutoring, and people took interest in helping me. Staying after school was always available. Even if it wasn’t my teacher, another teacher would help. Apex has different departments and student services for different needs—like grades or attendance. There’s a whole support system here.

AT: What would you tell someone who is thinking about enrolling?

Desks in an HVAC classroom at Apex Technical SchoolJW: The admissions process helped me choose my trade. Once the confusion was out of the way, Apex helped me complete the paperwork. Plus, the school helps balance course work and shop time. It’s already laid out for you.

AT: How do you feel now that you’re an Apex graduate?

JW: My experience at Apex was unexpectedly fast. It was a good experience because it trained me and motivated me to become a better man. I learned I could accomplish things. There were some ups and downs, but overall it was a good experience.

AT: Is there anything else you want to share about your experience?

JW: Before learning a trade, I was surrounded by a bad environment. But I set a standard for myself. I decided to walk the motivation. I almost became the motivation. This mindset introduced me to some of the other students’ stories and the paths they took to become motivated. I surrounded myself with people who had the same mindset and wanted to achieve the same goals. I knew I was on the right track because they were on the right track.

Learn More About Hands-On Training

If Jamil’s story inspired you, we encourage you to check out all the programs that Apex offers! Have questions? Contact us and we’ll help answer your questions, share program information, schedule you for a campus tour, and discuss your financial aid eligibility. Classes are starting soon!

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

Tom Tanski, electrical and advanced electrical program instructor at Apex

Get to Know Tom Tanski, Electrical & Advanced Electrical Program Instructor

“Teaching is the most rewarding job I ever had, and I can stay involved with the trade I love.”

A Legacy in the Trades

 

Tom Tanski comes from a long line of master craftsmen. His father was a general contractor and master plumber. His maternal grandfather was a union electrician, and many other family members were in construction. “I grew up doing carpentry and plumbing,” Tom says. “As soon as I was old enough to push a broom, I was on a construction site.”

Tom worked as a framing carpenter in his 20s. When he decided to become an electrician, he spent seven years attending night school while working during the day to learn his trade. He rose to the top of the profession and became a foreman, before a freak bowling injury derailed his career. He was 34.

I just picked up a bowling ball, there was a rupture, I had nerve damage and lost fine motor skills in my right hand.

A Fresh Start with Apex

While working as a traveling superintendent, living in hotel rooms across the country, Tom saw an APEX ad looking for teachers for its Electrical & Advanced Electrical program. He wasn’t sure he had the patience to teach, but he went to the interview anyway. That was 14 years ago.

“Teaching is the most rewarding job I ever had, and I can stay involved with the trade I love,” Tom says. “Most tradespeople don’t see themselves as teachers, yet all of us have taught apprentices in the field. We are teachers; we do this all the time. For any tradesperson who has physical limitations like I do, or anyone who has retired from the field but wants to work, this is the perfect career.”

The trades are more technically advanced than most people understand. In the electrical trades, for example, teachers and students alike are at the forefront of technology. Smart homes, next-generation solar technology, and electric car recharging stations all rely on electricity—one of the reasons why career prospects are so great for electricians.

There is so much that is rewarding about teaching for Tom. He can travel anywhere in the country and see buildings his students helped to construct. He loves seeing the moment when students finally grasp a difficult concept. And he loves giving back—one of his students was living in a shelter when he started the program, and now has his own apartment and pays his own bills.

“I was part of changing that student’s life. I never had a job before that offered that kind of reward. There is a pride in knowing you had that impact on someone’s life.”

Interested in changing lives by teaching the next generation of our workforce? Contact us at (212) 645-3300 or apply for an open position below.

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

Three construction workers stand on a jobsite, and one holds a yellow hard hat and site plans

Why Learn Construction Skills at a Trade School?

Construction and building professionals help America to grow as well as innovate safer, more environmentally friendly infrastructure. The field is not only a popular choice for trade students, but also an avenue for skills development. Individuals who work in construction or carpentry use a variety of skillsets, from electrical to plumbing, framing and finishing, and more.

If you’re interested in pursuing construction skills training, you may be wondering if trade classes are worth it. We’ll break down the benefits of hands-on technical training to help you decide a path that’s right for you.

Is Construction a Good Career Path?

A Construction & Building Skills student measures wood materials for joinery and carpentry work

Some students find that a trade career is a fulfilling path for them. Construction can be a field that positions an individual to expand his or her skillset and find more opportunities for professional growth. With hands-on training and years of experience, some construction tradespeople may even realize that they want to start their own construction or carpentry business.

Construction classes can introduce students to basic carpentry methods and tools that they can use on jobs once they enter the field. Classes also provide a structured, safety-focused learning environment, where students can ask questions and practice their skills alongside peers who share their passions. Through these experiences, students can gain skills and confidence that they could use in a construction career.

Construction Training Benefits

An Apex student stands on a ladder in front of a large wall that is covered in dry wall

There are many positive reasons to begin construction classes at Apex Technical School if you want to pursue a hands-on career in carpentry, building or construction. Top reasons include:

  • Hands-on training opportunities
  • Introduction to carpentry, electrical, plumbing, and kitchen and bath remodeling
  • Dedicated instructors
  • Classroom and shop learning environments
  • Safety knowledge
  • Practice using tools and equipment of the trade
  • Job placement assistance
  • Supportive admissions staff

Related: A Day in the Life of a Construction Student

Learn Construction & Building Skills at Apex

Ready to take the next step toward your goals? Apex Technical School is here to help! Construction classes are starting soon. Learn more about our Construction & Building Skills program now, or contact us to schedule a visit and see our campus and classrooms.

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

Protective glasses rest on a workshop table with other trade tools

Choosing a Program: Which Trade Is Best for Me?

Trade school is a popular choice for many people who want a career change. It’s also an alternative to community college or traditional university, which typically take two to four years to complete. In comparison, students can complete a trade program and enter the field much more quickly. You may agree that the benefits of trade school are clear—but how do you know which trade to pursue? Read on to learn how to make the right choice.

How do I choose a trade?

A Construction & Building Skills student measures wood materials for joinery and carpentry work

For some students, choosing a trade is easier than determining which vocational school to attend. Other students might have their sights set on a specific technical school, but they’re struggling to narrow down which trade program they want to pursue at that school. What should they do? Successful decision-making starts by breaking the task into manageable steps.

Get started with these three steps, and you’ll be on your way to making a solid choice in no time:

  • Compare

    Evaluate different trade schools based on the programs offered, faculty, hands-on learning opportunities, job placement assistance, and other factors.

  • Research

    Look into the trades that interest you. Research the industry, the day-to-day responsibilities, the tools and the working environment. Consider how a trade aligns with your passions and career goals. Could you imagine yourself in the field?

  • Request

    Contact your top trade schools to ask for more information. Ask questions about the trade programs that interest you, the classrooms and shops where you’d spend time learning, and request a tour of the school so you can feel firsthand if it’s a good fit for you.

Can I take more than one trade program at once?

An Electrical & Advanced Electrical student checks multi-colored wiring in an electrical boxIn some cases, students may want to pursue two trade programs. For example, a student may be interested in enrolling in Apex’s construction and electrical programs. At Apex, we encourage students to focus on one program at a time. Students learn hands-on trade skills, splitting 900 learning hours between the classroom and the shop.

Some students choose to return to Apex to enroll in a second program after they complete their first program. Apex welcomes students to return for more hands-on learning. In fact, some are second-generation students whose parents attended Apex before them.

Related: Tips to Find a Trade School

Find a Trade Program That’s Right for You at Apex

Since Apex Technical School opened its doors in 1961, it has trained tens of thousands of students. Our variety of trade programs offer students a hands-on, quality education. If you’re interested in a career change or pursuing a field you’re passionate about, contact us today. We can help you find a trade program that’s right for you.

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

After earning the EPA certification for HVAC, a technician diagnoses and repairs an A/C unit

Refrigerant Certification for HVAC Technicians

If you’re currently an HVAC student or you’re thinking of enrolling in HVAC trade classes, congratulations! This exciting field can be rewarding for many technicians who have a passion for problem-solving, details and working with their hands. However, before you can work with certain types of equipment and products in the HVAC trade, you must earn a special certification. Let’s explore what this certificate is and how you can earn it.

What Is the EPA Section 608 Certificate for HVAC?

An HVAC technician, who received the EPA 608 certificate, repairs a refrigerator in a residential home

The Section 608 certification measures HVAC technicians’ knowledge of handling various refrigeration products. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that technicians provide a safe and eco-friendly outcome when they’re working with air conditioning and refrigeration fluids.

What does this mean? The EPA explains:

EPA regulations under Section 608 of the Clean Air Act require that technicians who maintain, service, repair, or dispose of equipment that could release refrigerants into the atmosphere must be certified.

By earning this certificate, technicians demonstrate that they know the proper methods for handling and disposing of fluids that can have potentially harmful effects on the environment.

 

Related: How Long Is HVAC School?

How do I get certified under Section 608?

An Apex Technical School student takes the EPA 608 certification exam on a desktop computer
Technicians must pass an EPA-approved test to earn Section 608 certification. EPA-approved certifying organizations administer the test. The test is comprised of four parts with 25 multiple choice questions in each part. Apex Technical School encourages test takers to study before sitting for the exam.

Learn More About Air Conditioning & Refrigeration

Now that you understand how to get the EPA certification for HVAC technicians, it’s time to take the next step in your journey by enrolling in hands-on skills training. Apex offers HVAC classes in the day or evening to fit your schedule. Learn more about the HVAC program at Apex, or contact us now to get answers to your questions.

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

Electrician uses a digital meter to measure electrical voltage

Women Electricians in the Electrical Trade

The tide is turning for women electricians. Women make up an increasing percentage of skilled electrical workers. The electrical field can be a personally and professionally rewarding path, especially for women who enjoy being active while they work versus sitting at a desk. Like men, women have the potential to positively impact this industry. Here are a few ways female electricians can make a difference.

Break Down Stereotypes

A female electrician sets up an electricity box on a construction site while using a smartphone
For a long time, the electrical field was considered a man’s job. However, there is nothing inherently masculine about electricity—and women are just as capable of becoming electricians! Still, some women wonder if they can physically handle the day-to-day job. The answer? Yes!

Electricians typically don’t need to lift more than 50 lbs. on the job. As long as technicians are fit and adept, they can do the job regardless of gender. Overall, an electrical career path tends to be more practical than physically taxing. In other words, electricians use technical, hands-on skills and draw from their knowledge of the trade quite often.

As more women pursue hands-on learning and enter this field, they will continue to break down outdated stereotypes.

Contribute to Electrical Training Classes

Diverse environments can improve how students learn. Electrical classes benefit from the perspectives and contributions of female students. Electrical students learn about everything from electrical safety, blueprints, residential wiring, breakers and fuses, grounding, bonding, splicing, currents and outlets. Technician training teaches women on-the-job skills they can use in an entry-level electrical position, whether you’re a recent high school graduate or a woman wanting to change careers.

Related: A Day in the Life at Electrical School

Fill a Unique Need in Residential Electricity

Electrical student wears a ponytail, face shield and gloves to practice installing wiring in her electrical class
Some female customers feel uncomfortable when a man visits their home for a service call. Female electricians have a unique advantage in the residential electrical field—their presence can help put some customers at ease.

Want to Be a Woman in the Electrical Industry?

At Apex Technical School, we encourage all students to follow their passions and work hard to reach their educational and career goals. Women interested in pursuing an entry-level position in the electrical field can get 900 hours of hands-on training in as little as seven months. Want to explore our Electrical & Advanced Electrical program? Learn more now.

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

An auto repair technician working in an auto shop garage holds a wrench in her gloved hand

Women Mechanics in the Automotive Industry

Women mechanics make up more of the automotive repair industry than ever before. As increasing numbers of women enter the auto repair profession, many discover that the path is personally or professionally rewarding. Some women who have a passion for cars and hands-on work can find ways to contribute to this exciting industry as automotive technicians. Let’s dive deeper into how women can an impact in the auto repair field.

Following a Non-Traditional Path

While auto repair may be a non-traditional path for women historically, the trade is a good choice for women who are determined, hands-on and detail-oriented. The auto repair trade also gives female automotive technicians the opportunity to help others, as car ownership soars to new heights in the United States and people want mechanics they can trust. Customers need reliable, safety-minded and skilled auto mechanics to work on tires, breaks, suspension systems, axels and more. Just like men, women have the potential to turn their love of cars into a career they’re passionate about.

Related: How to Become an Auto Repair Technician

Automotive Training for Women

A female auto mechanic looks under the hood of a red carFemale mechanic students are starting to take up more seats in automotive training classes, where students learn about everything from automotive engines, chassis work, powertrains, electrical circuits of automobiles, fuel system components, diagnostic techniques and much more. Technician training teaches women on-the-job skills they can use in an entry-level auto repair position, whether you’re a recent high school graduate or a woman wanting to change careers and fine tune your future as a certified mechanic.

From Woman Mechanic to Auto Repair Shop Owner

With the right mix of experience and skills, individuals in the auto trade can make an impact under the car or behind the counter. Some automotive technicians have opened their own auto repair businesses. One example is Patricia Banks, who operates Girls Auto Clinic in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

An auto repair technician working in an auto shop garage holds a wrench in her gloved handThe number of cars on the road is expected to keep rising in the coming decades. Qualified auto technicians will be needed to repair and maintain vehicles, while some may even be inspired to gain the skills to open their own auto shop.

Want to Be a Woman in the Automotive Industry?

At Apex Technical School, we encourage all students to follow their passions and work hard to reach their educational and career goals. Women interested in pursuing an entry-level position in the auto repair field can get 900 hours of hands-on training in as little as seven months. Want to explore our Automotive Service & Repair program? Learn more now.

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

An electrician clips the end of a wire with wire cutters

Work Safer with These Electrician Tips

Individuals who work in the electrical field often enjoy a hands-on experience on the job. Electricians require practical skills, the ability to work alone or with others and a passion for problem-solving. The working environment for an electrician may be in a large commercial building or a small corner in a residential home. No matter where electricians apply their skills and knowledge, they should understand and follow electrical worker safety standards.

Electrical safety is critical, whether you’re an electrical student starting training classes or you’ve been working in the electrical field for decades. Safe protocols and gear can protect people, property and things from dangers such as burns, sparks and electrical fires. Explore some electrical safety tips and keep these top-of-mind when you’re handing electrical wiring.

 

Assess the Work Setting

An electrician assesses a breaker box before beginning his repairsWhen an electrician arrives on a jobsite, he or she should pause and gain an understanding of the environment. Where is the electrical box? Are there current dangers, such as smoke or water near electrical currents? If the situation is not an emergency, are there any potential hazards? Incorrectly installed equipment may not be immediately noticeable. Take a few moments to look over the work setting and prepare yourself for the job at hand.

Equip Yourself with Safety Gear

Safety gear is one of the most important parts of staying safe in the workplace. It’s a good idea to keep all your electrical safety gear with you when you travel to jobsites so you aren’t putting yourself at risk. Items like insulated gloves protect your hands from electrical currents, while protective eyewear keeps your vision safe from sparks.

If you are working on a construction project with the potential for falling debris, don’t forget to wear a hard hat to ward off injuries from heavy or sharp objects. Some individuals wear flame-retardant clothing that covers your arms and legs. In the event that an electrical spark starts a fire near you, fire-retardant clothing can keep your skin protected from burns.

Related: Is the Electrical Trade the Path for You?

Use a Multimeter to Test Wires

An electrician uses her multimeter to safely check electrical wiresA multimeter is a handheld electrical tool used to test voltage, resistance and current. This tool may be standard in the electrical trade, but it is important for testing to see if a wire is safe. If the multimeter determines the component is weak enough, you can safely handle or touch the wire during the repair job. Always use a multimeter to test wires; other tools like screwdrivers or wrenches should not be used to check potentially live components.

 

Electrical safety is the first rule of working in the electrical trade. With electrician training, you can help keep your work environment safe and productive. Learn more about the Electrical & Advanced Electrical program at Apex Technical School. Classes are starting soon!

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

A graduate from HVAC technical school inspects an air conditioning unit on a commercial building

How Long Is HVAC School?

HVAC training is a popular option for students who feel inspired by heating, air conditioning and ventilation as a potential career path. However, if you’re motivated to start working in the field quickly, you may be wondering just how long HVAC school takes to complete. Here’s some good news: training classes at HVAC technical school might not take as long as you think.

How Long Does It Take to Get an HVAC Certificate?

At Apex Technical School, students can spend as little as 7 months in the HVAC program. This timeline is long enough to give students 900 hours between the classroom and the shop, while also providing a more direct route to completion than a community college or traditional university, which can take two to four years on average.

Now that you have an answer to the question, “How long is HVAC training?,” let’s explore the benefits an HVAC training program will offer you during that time period.
An HVAC student wears a belt with HVAC training program tools and instruments

Hands-On Experience

In the HVAC program at Apex, students get opportunities to practice hands-on techniques that they can carry with them after graduation. Students learn to maintain and repair domestic and commercial air conditioning and refrigeration systems, electrical controls, major home appliances and gas-fired heating systems. They move from basic courses to more advanced classes, practicing their skills and HVAC theory along the way.

Opportunity to Learn Alongside Others

In addition to gaining hands-on experience in six courses throughout the HVAC training program, students also get the opportunity to learn with like-minded peers who share their interests. Dedicated instructors with field knowledge lead classes and demonstrate technical methods used within the HVAC industry. Through collaboration and instruction, students practice what it means to work through challenges together and independently—just like in the workforce.

Related: How Hands-On Learning Benefits Trade Job Seekers
HVAC technical schools like Apex prepare students with skills for their career path

Preparation for an Entry-Level Position

When you want to break into a new industry, such as the HVAC industry, an entry-level position is an important goal. Apex helps you on your journey to realize that goal by providing a path to learning the HVAC trade and giving helpful resources. From job placement assistance to resume writing tips and interview preparation, support is available at Apex.

Learn More About Our HVAC Technical School

Don’t get cold feet. Take the next step, and learn more about our HVAC program. Explore topics covered in our HVAC classes, request information and more. We’re happy to answer your questions about enrollment, start dates, financial aid opportunities and classes. Simply contact us online to get started.

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

A collection of woodworking tools used in carpentry trades lies on a weathered workbench

What Do Carpenters Do? Here’s a Breakdown

A carpenter or builder is a vital contributor to the construction trade. Carpenters construct, repair, and install building frameworks and structures made from wood and other materials, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Many work indoors on fine details for cabinetry, walls and even furniture, while other carpenters work outdoors on the skeleton of a building or the temporary bracing for large-scale structures like bridges or sewers.

Woodworkers rely on carpentry tools to craft and shape their materials. Door frames, stairwells, rafters, and many other residential and commercial building elements are made of wood. Therefore, these professionals use basic carpentry tools—from tape measures to table saws—to help accomplish daily tasks.

Types of Carpenters

A commercial carpenter uses a circular saw to cut wood for a window frame at an office buildingLike doctors, there are different types of carpenters. You wouldn’t go to a surgeon for a sore throat, and you wouldn’t hire a cabinetmaker to install door frames for a strip mall. Often, professionals focus on a specific area within the carpentry and building trade. Let’s review some common types of carpenters and explore their specialties.

  • Cabinetmaker

    This carpenter does fine and detailed work, specifically wardrobes, chests and built-in pantries.

  • Joiner

    This carpenter does finish work where exact joints are critical, such as furniture making and model building.

  • Formwork carpenter

    This carpenter creates falsework, or temporary structures used to support a permanent structure until it is complete enough to support itself.

  • Framer

    This carpenter builds the framework of buildings.

  • Trim carpenter

    This carpenter does molding, trim, door and window casings, baseboards and mantels

  • Green carpenter

    This carpenter practices environmentally friendly, energy efficient and sustainable methods and often uses fewer materials to achieve structural accuracy.

3 Industries Where Carpenters Work

A residential carpenter erects the framing for a houseCarpenters can be highly valuable trade workers for several industries. Their hands-on training, attention to detail and knowledge of woodworking make them assets on a jobsite and for growing the nation’s infrastructure. The three main industries that employ carpenters are:

  1. Residential

    Carpenters in the residential construction industry help to build single-family homes, apartments and condos. They assemble the framework and walls, lay flooring and complete finish work, such as built-in cabinetry, moldings, mantels and trim.

  2. Commercial

    Carpenters in this field work on retail stores, malls, office buildings, high-rise buildings and restaurants. They interpret construction plans, build framework and install windows and doors, all using power tools and hands-on skills.

  3. Industrial

    Carpenters who work in the industrial field specialize in large projects like dams, tunnels and sewers. They may provide the temporary bracing, called falsework, required to hold up the structure during construction. Sawing, shaping, installing and repairing comprise some of their common tasks in the industrial industry.

So, You Want to Be a Carpenter?

Now that you know a little more about the carpentry trades and the different types of carpenters, you may have a clearer idea about your future. If your passions include working with your hands or constructing something completely new—carpentry might be a good fit for you! Check out our Construction & Building Skills Program to see what you could learn in 900 hours split between the classroom and the shop.

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

A wrench and automotive transmission parts rest on a gray cement floor

What Is the ASE Certification for Auto Mechanics?

The National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) tests and certifies automotive professionals to improve the quality of vehicle repair and service. The ASE certification signifies that an individual knows how to repair a vehicle without causing further damage.

When drivers take their vehicles to an auto repair shop, they want reassurance that the auto technician has the skills to complete the task at hand. With ASE-certified mechanics, repair shops communicate to customers that they are prepared to meet quality standards.

How do I become ASE certified?

Individuals must meet certain criteria to apply for ASE certification. They must:

  • Show two years of experience in the automotive repair industry
  • Be able to complete and pass the specialty examination, which is only offered twice per year
  • Choose the specialty type of ASE certification they would like to receive — they can become certified in breaks, heating and cooling, and suspension.

Study guides and an online practice test can help individuals prepare to take the ASE certification test. The practice test is an opportunity to experience what the test questions and format will be like prior to taking the exam.
An engine in the shop at Apex Technical School where students learn hands-on skills

How long does it take to earn my ASE certification?

The ASE certification test takes 2–2 ½ hours to complete. To qualify to take the test, technicians must first complete two years of qualified work experience in the automotive repair industry. For many technicians in training, this experience starts with hands-on learning at a trade school like Apex.

Apex’s instruction, course of study, facilities, and equipment have been evaluated by Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) and the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF).
A silver sprinter van is raised up on an automotive lift in the shop at Apex Technical School

Why is the ASE certification important?

The ASE certification gives vehicle owners peace of mind when they take their car to the shop for repairs. More than 250,000 individuals in the U.S. have earned the ASE certification. Auto technicians also benefit from earning the certification, which shows they have the mechanical, electrical and systems knowledge to work on vehicles safely and accurately.

Start Auto Repair Training Today

Consider our Auto Repair Program as one of the ways to kick off your future in automotive repair training. Apex offers hands-on training, split between the classroom and the shop, so students learn automotive theory and technical skills. Classes are starting soon; contact us to speak to our admissions staff and tour the Apex campus.

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

Welding sparks light up a dark room

Where Do Welders Work?

Companies, factories and construction jobsites need welders to fabricate and repair equipment and building materials. Without metal work like welding, things like infrastructure, commercial products and certain everyday items would not exist.

In fact, welders are greatly responsible for building much of the world around us. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 64% of welders work in the manufacturing industry. Welders can also work in the following industries:

  • Aerospace
  • Automotive
  • Construction
  • Electrical power generation
  • Industrial maintenance
  • Natural gas
  • Railroad
  • Shipbuilding

Let’s dive a little deeper into three of these industries to learn how welders make an impact and what their daily tasks might look like.

Manufacturing

The types of welders who work in the manufacturing industry use welds to create new products or repair old ones. Furniture, mining machinery, agricultural tools and many other everyday items require a welder to heat and join their components together with welds. MIG welding is standard in the manufacturing industry because it is fast and cost effective. A wide range of metal types play a role in the manufacturing of commercial products and equipment, and MIG welding is versatile and flexible enough to handle them.

Related: Common Questions About Welding Training

Auto Industry

An Apex student wears protective gear and practices welding techniques in the shopDid you know that the average car requires thousands of welds? Welding has been, and will remain, a critical process for the automotive industry. Welders play a vital role on auto assembly lines, as well as at dealerships and auto repair shops where welding is required for safe repairs. Workers in these environments commonly use MIG welding or laser MIG welding to create strong bonds between thin metals such as aluminum.

Building, Construction & Infrastructure

An Apex student wears yellow welding gloves and works at a welding bench in the shopGlobally, more than half of all steel is used in commercial and residential construction. With such a great demand for steel in this industry, the need for welding is also strong. From erecting skyscrapers and office buildings to neighborhood homes, apartments and even roads and bridges, welders help construct America. Common types of welding used in building and infrastructure include flux-core welding, MIG welding and plasma arc welding.

 

Could you see yourself pursuing a future in welding? Start your path as a welder at Apex Technical School, where you can learn SMAW, GTAW, GMAW in our hands-on shops and classrooms. Classes are starting soon—contact us to learn more.

 

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

An electrician repairs home electrical wiring behind a light switch

What Is a Pipefitter and What Do They Do?

Pipefitters are specialist plumbers. They work with high-pressure piping systems, commercial or industrial heating and cooling systems, and some may even maintain fuel delivery systems. Though their roles may seem similar, a pipefitter and a plumber support different scenarios.

A pipefitter handles jobs that have potentially dangerous substances, like chemicals or steam, while a plumber handles jobs that involve water and waste. Learn more about pipefitters below, including a detailed pipefitter job description, a pipefitter tool list and environments where pipefitters may work.

Pipefitter Job Description

Pipefitters design and assemble pipe structures that carry chemicals, steam or liquids. They often work on commercial and/or industrial properties by laying out, assembling, installing and maintaining piping systems. Pipefitters can collaborate with project managers and understand how to read a blueprint that describes piping requirements. They follow building codes and safety standards, and they wear personal protective equipment to stay secure on the job.

How does Apex prepare students for a future in plumbing and pipefitting? Learn about a day in the life of a plumbing and pipefitting student.

Pipefitter Jobsites and Industries

Many industries need skilled pipefitters. Common industries that employ pipefitters include:
Pipefitter wearing orange gloves uses a wrench to repair pipes

  • Local government
  • Natural gas distribution
  • Utility system construction
  • Commercial building construction
  • Industrial building construction

Pipefitters can work at various jobsites, such as utility companies, hospitals, gas plants, waste management settings, heating and air ventilation companies, oil refineries or chemical plants. Depending on qualifications, project need and skill level, certain jobsites might require both pipefitters and plumbers.

Pipefitter Tool List

Pipefitting tools including a wrench and gloves

Pipefitters have hands-on skills and knowledge of piping systems, as well as the tools required to install and maintain these important systems. Some tools that pipefitters may use include:

  • Welder’s gauge
  • Fitter grips
  • Pipefitter’s square
  • Flange aligners
  • Pipe wraps
  • Centering head

While this is not a complete list, these items can help pipefitters to get the job done, whether they work in a commercial or industrial environment.

Want to Start Pipefitting Training?

 If you’re interested in pursuing a career based on hands-on skills, pipefitting might be right for you. Grow your knowledge of plumbing and pipefitting at Apex Technical School. Classes are starting soon, and we’d like to show you our classrooms and shops. Learn more about pipefitting training now, and contact us to schedule a visit.

 

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

Four construction workers stand together on a jobsite reviewing construction framing terms

House Framing Terminology 101

Construction framing is the process of attaching building materials together to create a structure, like a house, office or apartment. Framing is an important building element, because it must be energy efficient and strong enough to withstand outside forces such as wind, snow, earthquakes, gravity, people and more.

You can start learning house framing terminology to become familiar with all pieces of the structure. If you’re learning construction and building skills, you may have encountered some of these framing terms already. See how well you know important terms involved in building walls, floors and windows.

Wall Framing Terminology

Two students at Apex in the Construction & Building Skills Program learn hands-on in the shop

  • Plates are horizontal boards in a wall connected by studs. A top plate is located at the top of the wall panel, while a bottom plate is located at the bottom of the wall panel.
  • Studs are vertical 2×4 boards in a wall that connect the top plate with the bottom plate. Builders use studs when they construct walls, doors and windows.
  • Headers are horizontal boards used to transfer loads to trimmers (which are also called “jack studs” or short studs around a window or door). Headers are installed over a window or door opening.

Floor Framing Terminology

  • Joists are horizontal boards in a floor. Like studs, they are spaced at equal distances. Joists make up the platform to which wall panels are affixed.
  • Header brand joists connect joists together by wrapping around the joists. They provide stability.
  • Subflooring rests on the joists. It is the bottommost layer and acts as the foundation beneath the finished flooring material, such as hardwood, carpet or tile. Subflooring is usually made from plywood.
  • Girders are the main horizontal supports. Girders hold and stabilize the joists.

Window and Door Framing Terminology

A model house with white siding is constructed by Apex students who learned house framing terminology

  • A sill or saddle is installed under a window. The window rests on the sill or saddle for support.
  • Cripples are vertical boards that support the sill or saddle and the window itself.
  • Trimmers are also called “jack studs.” They are installed vertically from the header to the sill. Trimmers help transfer the load that the header carries.

 

Want to Learn Construction and Building Skills?

It may sound complicated, but construction framing is manageable when builders take it step by step. If you’re passionate about working with your hands and learning practical skills, the Construction and Building Skills Program at Apex might be the right path for you.

Our program teaches students framing terminology as well as electrical, plumbing and kitchen and bath remodeling skills. Ready to learn more? Contact us today! Classes are starting soon.

 

 

 

Sources
https://www.familyhandyman.com/list/house-framing-terms/
https://www.zeelandlumber.com/basic-house-framing-terms-you-need-to-know/

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

Auto mechanic reviews an auto shop safety checklist

Work Safely with These Auto Repair Guidelines

A career in automotive repair can be fun and challenging for individuals who enjoy working with their hands. Automotive work requires technicians to know how to safely use certain machinery and tools, as well as workplace safety habits. Technicians should always take precautions to minimize their risk of injury or accidents. Let’s brush up on some common auto repair shop policies and procedures for a job in automotive service repair.

Wear Personal Protective Equipment

An automotive technician in training wears safety gloves to work on a car
Automotive technicians often wear long-sleeve shirts and long pants to protect from burns, cuts and scrapes. Clothing should fit the body well, because loose garments can get caught in equipment. In addition to clothing, individuals who work in the automotive repair trade should wear protective gear such as safety glasses or goggles and gloves that are chemical resistant to protect their skin.

Maintain a Safety Routine

Individuals who work in an automotive shop can stay safe by incorporating proper procedures into their daily routine. When safety is the standard, you’re less likely to make careless or dangerous mistakes. This starts with knowing your surroundings. Notice something out of place, like liquid on the floor? Clean up water or oil spills right away to reduce the risk of falls.

Label chemicals used in the shop and keep safety data sheets that explain how to handle and store chemicals. In case of a chemical-related emergency, auto mechanics should have easy access to an eye-wash station and know how to turn off the electricity in the shop. Be aware of electrical cords and outlets to prevent scenarios in which an electrical fire could start. Technicians should also know where to find fire extinguishers and understand how to use them in an emergency.

Related: How to Become an Auto Repair Technician

Ask Others for Support

While some mechanics typically have a hands-on trade school or vocational education, they may encounter new tasks or challenges on the job throughout their career. There is always an opportunity to learn more, especially as vehicles evolve with new makes and models. When you’re unsure how to complete a task or you’re doing something for the first time, speak up and ask for help.

Incorrect procedures can cause dangerous situations or serious injuries. It’s also important to speak up if you notice something is malfunctioning or broken, such as a vehicle lift or poorly maintained equipment. Be mindful of coworkers who may not ask for help when they need it; for example, if they attempt to lift more than they can carry, help them safely transport the item.

A mechanic and his manager follow auto repair shop policies and procedures

 

Auto shop safety is the first rule of working in an automotive repair shop. With automotive technician training, mechanics can help keep their work environment safe and productive. Learn more about the Automotive Service Repair Program at Apex Technical School. Classes are starting soon!

 

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

A hand places a wooden cube on a stack of cubes

5 Questions to Ask Before Enrolling in Trade School

How you pursue your education is one of the biggest decisions you can make. Education means something different for everyone. Sometimes it’s a high-school diploma, a four-year college degree, workforce experience, or a hands-on trade program. And it could be a combination! If you’re determined to pursue a vocational program at a trade school in New York, you’ll want to make sure you find a program that will give you the opportunity to meet your goals.

There are many things to consider as you decide to find a trade school that is right for you. Here are the first five questions to ask before enrolling in trade school. Keep reading to find answers to each question below.

  1. What am I interested in?
  2. What vocational programs are available?
  3. Does the trade school offer day and evening classes?
  4. Does the trade school offer job placement assistance?
  5. Does the trade school accept financial aid?
  1. What am I interested in?

    A student learns to repair a car in an automotive shop class
    Before you can answer the question, “What trade school is right for me?” think about what you enjoy doing. What are your interests and passions? What would you be happy to learn more about? If you’ve always enjoyed cars and hands-on repair, you might consider a trade school with an automotive service repair program. Maybe you recently talked to a family member or friend about their HVAC career and could see yourself in a similar role. Examine where your interests lie and consider how you could bring your unique strengths to a trade.

  2. What vocational programs are available?

    After you determine what trade you’re interested in, seek out trade schools in your area with accredited programs. Visit the school’s website to learn about its program offerings. Websites like Apex Technical School’s give a breakdown of each trade program and what students can learn. As you research, it might be helpful to contact the school to ask program-related questions, like start times or what tools students need.

  3. Does the trade school offer day and evening classes?

    Next, find out when the school offers class times. If you work or care for your family during the day, an evening class might be best for you. If you feel most productive during the day, you might want to choose an earlier class time. Your lifestyle and needs play an important part in your educational success, so don’t forget to factor them into your decision.

    Related: The Benefits of Evening Trade School Classes

  4. Does the trade school offer job placement assistance?

    Trade school financial aid forms
    Not all trade schools offer job placement assistance. Schools like Apex want to make sure students have access to helpful materials when they are looking for a job. Find out if the trade school offers help with resumes or preparing for a job interview. Ask if the trade school will help you search for career options that fit your training and goals.

  5. Does the trade school accept financial aid?

    Financial aid can help eligible students cover costs. While applying for financial aid may seem overwhelming at first, some trade schools like Apex help students throughout the entire process. Choose a trade school with financial aid advisors that will offer to meet with you one-on-one to discuss financial aid forms and navigate the process. There are several different types of financial aid programs, and the trade school you choose can work with you to offer the best possible combination of aid, such as Federal Student Aid programs, aid from state programs and other miscellaneous programs.

 

Interested in learning if Apex is a good fit for you? We’re happy to sit down with you to talk about trade school options or answer your questions on the phone. Contact us today; classes are starting soon!

 

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

benefits of trade school vs community college

Trade Schools vs. Community Colleges

Considering trade school vs. college? Technical skills can offer career options and personal fulfillment, especially if you enjoy hands-on work. If you’re unsure how learning a trade can benefit you or fit into your schedule, explore the top reasons why students choose to enroll in trade school.

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Classes are starting soon! Call us at 212-645-3300 to find out more.

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

 

A student in a welding classroom at Apex Technical School

New Welding Technologies

Many of the world’s biggest industries—from marine and automotive to mass transportation and more—use welding to create and repair products. Without welding, we would not be able to use many of the items we use every day. Did you know this necessary trade is still evolving since its invention centuries ago? Today, new welding technologies are here or on the horizon for this exciting trade.

Welding Technology History

Welding technology dates back to the Industrial Revolution in 1750. The first type of welding was called forge welding, and it involved heating two metal ends until the material was hot enough to be hammered together. In the centuries since forge welding was invented, welding technology has improved and evolved as an in-demand process. Welding technology is opening even more doors for advancing the field today.

Related: Related: The Benefits of Going to Trade School for Plumbing
High-precision laser welding

Laser Welding

Laser welding is one of the newest types of welding technology. With laser welding, light energy is converted to heat energy. The high-powered laser instantly melts metals and welds them together. For very thick, dense metals, laser welding should still be used in combination with other welding types. However, the potential is great for laser welding. Scientists are continuing to research and test this new welding technology, and more advancements are expected in the coming years.

Virtual Reality for Welding

Most people think about video games when they hear the term virtual reality, or VR. This technology uses a headset to immerse wearers in a digital experience. Some experts believe that VR can be used to revolutionize prototypes, blueprints for a product, and even welding training. One day soon, welders may be able to view an item in virtual reality to more easily understand the eventual finished product.

A person wears a virtual reality headset, which could one day improve welding processes, prototypes and training

Welding Safety Enhancements

Safe technology is also important for welding processes. Along with advanced welding technologies, like laser welding and virtual reality, the welding field has an eye on the future of welding gear and safety. Technology can help welders make choices that keep them safe on the job, whether they are an entry-level welder or a veteran of the trade.

Thanks to technological advancements, here are some welding safety options:

  • Automated doors
  • Safety light curtains
  • Laser scanners and sensors
  • Pressure-sensitive safety mats
  • Fume extraction systems
  • Air-filtering respirators
  • Insulated clothing

 

Interested in where advanced welding technology is headed? Have a passion for crafting and repairing, or love working with your hands? Welding trade school might be a good fit for you. Explore our welding program now, or contact us by filling out our online form.

 

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

A variety of hammers, screwdrivers, pliers and other tools on a black canvas backdrop

Tips to Find a Trade School

Looking for a new career path? Unsure what to do after high school? Trade school can be an exciting option that focuses on growing your skills. Unlike a four-year or two-year college, trade school can be completed quickly and without the need to take courses unrelated to your passion (like English literature or geography).

To find the right trade school, start by researching trade schools near you in the New York City area such as Long Island City, Queens and understanding the benefits of trade school. We also recommend finding out as much as you can about these three important indicators.

  1. Hands-On Learning

    An Apex HVAC student and instructor work on wiring in the shop

    If you’re interested in pursuing an education in the trades, you probably enjoy working with your hands. You may even prefer hands-on work to sitting at an office desk. When you want to find a trade school that is a good fit for you, find out if the school has a balance of hands-on shop time paired with classroom time. In the classroom, instructors can introduce theories of the trade, while the shop setting can help you practice techniques that bring theories to life.

    Apex’s trade programs offer a mix of classroom and shop time. Students split 900 certificate hours between these two environments. We offer most courses in day or evening time slots, and students can often finish their program in as little time as seven months! That’s a big benefit of trade school.

  2. Technology and Tools

    When you’re choosing a trade school, visit the campus if possible. This visit can give you the chance to tour the classrooms and shop areas, see the tools and equipment and ask questions about the facilities or technology you may use. The right trade school will give you the opportunity to learn skills using tools and technology that you may encounter in an entry-level position in the industry.

    Related: Benefits of Construction Technology

  3. Job Placement Assistance

    An Apex welding student learns to use a welding torch in the shop

    An education in the trades can be a great path. Think about how you might put your hands-on training to use in an entry-level job. Trade schools often have individuals who meet with you to offer career-related assistance, such as creating a resume, preparing for an interview and searching for a position in the field.

    Here on the Apex campus in Long Island City, New York, we join our colleagues across The Fedcap Group in working to ensure no one is left behind. Helping people get to work is our contribution to counter exclusion and marginalization. We also offer job placement assistance and help students search for career options that fit their training and goals.

Pursue Your Passion at Apex

As you consider your options and learn about trade schools in New York, we invite you to take some time to explore our programs, and learn how financial aid might be available to you. Have questions? Contact us at (212) 645-3300 or by submitting our online form now.

 

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

A residential plumber wearing black gloves fixes pipes under a sink

Commercial Plumbers vs. Residential Plumbers

Plumbing is nothing more than clogged drains and leaky pipes, right? Not exactly. Plumbing is more complicated than repairing a sink or toilet. Plumbers are skilled in their craft, with hours of hands-on training and diverse experiences. In fact, the plumber who answers a repair call in a neighborhood may not be the same type of plumber who installs new pipes in an office.

3 Differences Between Types of Plumbers

Some plumbers may specialize in residential plumbing (working in single family homes). Other plumbers may specialize in commercial plumbing (working in multifamily apartment buildings, offices or businesses). Each type of plumber should have training and history of the plumbing field; however, each may deal with unique tasks and apply their plumbing knowledge differently. Here are three ways that a commercial plumber may differ from a residential plumber.

  1. Work Schedule

    A residential plumber repairs a faucet on a kitchen sinkWork schedule is one of the first differences between commercial and residential plumbers. Plumbers who work in residential homes usually work a standard eight-hour work day, five days per week. They may be on call for weekend or after-hour emergencies, such as a burst pipe that floods a kitchen in the middle of the night.

    Commercial plumbers, on the other hand, may have more after-hours work. This is because offices or public buildings tend to schedule installations and repairs outside of the traditional eight-to-five working hours, when their employees are at home and it’s easier for plumbers to turn off water access or work more efficiently. Commercial plumbers can also have a more fast-paced schedule than residential plumbers, since many people depend on their repairs or installations.

  2. Environment

    Residential plumbers can often expect to work in the same type of environment each day. Homes typically have several sinks, two or three toilets and a standard patchwork of pipes and drains. Residential plumbers may have to problem-solve to bring old systems up to code.

    Commercial plumbers can face a variety of different environments on the job. The buildings where they work may have multiple floors with many sinks and toilets. Access to pipes may be more difficult, and installation work may take longer or be more complex than in a residential setting.

    Related: The Benefits of Going to Trade School for Plumbing

  3. Pipes and Fixtures

    A red water valve on a blue commercial plumbing pipeThe size and durability of commercial pipes varies from residential pipes. Because numerous people need to access and use commercial plumbing in a large building or apartment complex, commercial pipes are more robust. Commercial offices or multifamily units may also use different types of toilets, such as water-saving toilets, to conserve on utilities while giving residents or employees access to modern or innovative fixtures.

Residential and commercial plumbing may also be subject to different codes and standards. Plumbers and pipefitters must follow building regulations and residential guidelines to ensure safety and compliance. At Apex, students learn about plumbing safety, as well as plumbing history and how to use common plumbing tools and techniques.

 

Find out more about what you can learn in our Plumbing & Pipefitting program now

 

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

Woman in HVAC trade repairs an air conditioner with screw driver

Women in the HVAC Trade

Countless opportunities exist for women in skilled trades, especially in the HVAC industry. According to Women of HVAC, female-owned businesses have increased 1.5 times faster than the national average in the past 20 years, and there has been a similar rise in female HVAC technicians. If you’re interested in pursuing a hands-on education to become a woman in the skilled trades, here’s why the HVAC industry may be the path for you.

Women Succeed in HVAC Programs

Student learning to be a woman in the skilled trades in HVAC class at ApexWomen are often an underutilized resource when it comes to skilled trades. As more baby boomers retire over the next decade, the HVAC industry will need skilled individuals to step into the field and thrive.

Historically, the industry has been male-dominated, but that trend has already started to change as more women pursue HVAC programs at trade schools. Women in HVAC classes at Apex can receive a hands-on education that prepares them for an entry-level position.

Why Women are an Asset in the HVAC Industry

If you’re a woman who enjoys hands-on work, the technical nature of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning field may suit your interests. Women who have strong communication skills also thrive in environments that involve talking with customers, explaining repairs and scheduling maintenance. Plus, some female customers may be more comfortable with a female HVAC technician in their home so you may find that you fill a need for some customers.

 

HVAC industry woman wearing yellow work vest fixes a commercial air conditioner

How Women Transform Skilled Trades

Women in skilled trades are not only an asset to their industry but also an inspiration to others who aspire to follow in their footsteps. Representation matters, and more female HVAC technicians will show women everywhere that they might find fulfillment in the HVAC trade, too.

Finally, as more women technicians step into the HVAC industry, they have the potential to deepen their knowledge with years of experience and eventually serve as entrepreneurs of their own HVAC company—showing other women that they can contribute to and transform this exciting field.

 

 

Discover Apex’s HVAC Program

Turn your ambitions into reality by learning how you can kickstart your path as a female HVAC technician. Our team is happy to talk to you about women in the HVAC program at Apex or help you schedule a time to come to our campus and learn about enrollment. Get started by visiting our HVAC Program page or contacting us.

 

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

Gears with the words potential, skills and ideas written to represent the benefits of trade school

The Benefits of Evening Trade School Classes

Between family obligations, work and friends, it can be hard to find time to fit trade school classes into your day. But a busy schedule doesn’t have to stop you from pursuing your goals in a trade you’re passionate about. At Apex, students have the option to choose day or night classes. Taking classes in the evening is one of the many benefits of trade school that can help set you up for success. Keep reading to learn why going to trade school at night might be right for you.

  1. You can keep your day job

    A box of different plumbing parts used in night classes at Apex Technical SchoolTrade school students often already have a day job, whether they work part-time or full time. Some are inspired to go to trade school and pursue the hands-on career they’ve always wanted, while others decide to go back to school to try something new. No matter what motivates you, night classes can give you the opportunity to maintain your day job while attending trade school in the evening after work.

  2. You can balance your personal life and school

    When your day shift is over and you head home, you probably enjoy some down time with family and friends. Maybe you pick up groceries for dinner, go to your favorite restaurant or drop by your nephew’s basketball game. Our personal lives are important, and when you attend evening classes at trade school, you can find a balance between personal responsibilities during the day and learning a trade at night.

    Related: 3 Important Life Lessons to Learn in Trade School

  3. You can prepare yourself for class

    Students take night classes for Apex's Electrical programWhen your trade classes don’t start until the evening, you may notice that you have time throughout the day to read about the history of plumbing, practice identifying the different types of electrical wires or organize your toolbox to use in the shop. You can use work breaks or lunch hours to prepare for class and think about techniques you’ll practice in the shop when your shift ends and you head to school.

Contact Apex About Trade School Classes

Trade school classes in the evening can help accommodate many schedules. If you can’t postpone your day job, consider night classes. If you have family responsibilities or want to have moments to study throughout the day, evening classes might be a good fit for your goals. Night classes are starting soon—reach out to our admissions team today to learn more about enrolling.

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

A person using six dice pieces with letters to spell out the word "hands on"

Why Hands-On Learning Is Important for Entry-Level Trade Jobs

Practical, hands-on skills are important in many industries, and workers who demonstrate these skills contribute to a healthy economy. While millions of Americans work behind a desk, there are countless Americans who enjoy actively working with their hands and using their technical expertise.

However, a recent analysis from PeopleReady found that there is a skilled trades shortage in America. The shortage is occurring as millions of Baby Boomers retire and leave the workforce. The good news? Some students are choosing trade school instead of traditional two-year or four-year college. By choosing trade school—which can often be completed in as few as 7 months—students can get the hands-on skills they need to enter the workforce faster.

Let’s examine a few reasons why a hands-on education at trade school can set up students for success in their chosen trade.

Problem-Solving Practice

Problem-solving means making choices. And trade workers must make many choices on the job each day. Safety, proper techniques, maintenance and installation approaches all contribute to a tradesperson’s responsibilities. If you enter a trade you’re passionate about, you’ll want to be a strong problem-solver.

Hands-on training can be a key way to become a strong problem-solver because it gives you the opportunity to practice making decisions in the classroom or shop setting so you feel confident and prepared when you start your career. For example, a student in the Electrical & Advanced Electrical program may have to decide what type of wiring is needed to repair a broken fixture. Working hands-on in the shop gives students the opportunity to determine the best way to solve electrical problems.

 

Related: 6 Benefits of Trade School

Mentorship Opportunities

An Apex student in the Construction & Building Skills program learns to assemble walls

In addition to problem-solving practice, hands-on learning provides students with opportunities to learn alongside experienced instructors. As knowledge keepers, instructors at Apex are dedicated to helping students gain technical skills and expand their passion for their chosen trade. Students learn the theory, or the “why,” behind their trade in the classroom. Instructors also mentor students in the shop where theory is put into practice.

Students in the Construction & Building Skills program, for example, work with instructors to construct a model house, learning how to frame walls, install windows and more. Guidance from knowledgeable instructors increases students’ readiness to perform entry-level trade jobs in the field.

 

An Apex student in the Electrical & Advanced Electrical program learns to maintain a fuse box

Safety Training

Safety preparation is one of the most important aspects of a job site, and it’s also one of the benefits that hands-on learning affords students in trade school. At Apex, students learn how to safely use tools, wear safety gear and collaborate carefully in work environments. From handling electrical components to practicing fire safety around welding materials and more, students at Apex get – experience in learning to stay safe on the job. This experience can help students stand out to employers who want safety-minded individuals on their jobsites.

 

 

 

Ready to learn more about trade programs and hands-on education at Apex Technical School? Contact us today to start the conversation.

 

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

An auto mechanic works on a car engine in a garage

How to Become an Auto Repair Technician

Do you think you want to become an automotive technician? Do you know what it takes to be a mechanic? The automotive service industry is full of talented mechanics who enjoy working on cars and problem-solving. Let’s take a look at three common indicators of success that you can use to guide you on your path to automotive technician training.

Have a Passion for Cars

Two wrenches in an automotive service garageThere are many reasons why car enthusiasts and automotive technicians love cars. They are powerful and practical. Cars are painstakingly designed and tested for their aerodynamic and safety qualities. And cars give you the freedom to go where you want to go. Some automotive technicians developed a passion for cars at a young age, while others grew to love cars over time. No matter how your passion for cars started, you can harness that inspiration to pursue a future doing what you love as a car technician.

Enjoy Hands-On Work

Do you enjoy assembling parts and tinkering with machinery? You’re not alone! Many automotive technicians practiced disassembling toys as children or learned about vehicles by taking the initiative to look under the hood of a car. One thing automotive technicians have in common is their aptitude for hands-on work. Car technicians often work in bustling garages or service departments instead of sitting behind a desk. Enjoyment for hands-on work is helpful for individuals who aspire to become technicians.

 

Related: What Skills Do I Need to Become a Mechanic?

Seek Vocational or Technical Training

Two Apex students in the Automotive Service & Repair program learn to perform maintenance checks on a car

A passion for cars and hands-on work can take you far. But why is vocational school needed? It’s important to gain fundamental automotive skills that can set you up for success in the field. At Apex, the Automotive Service & Repair program offers students the opportunity to learn about auto theory in the classroom and put their knowledge to use by working on cars in the shop.

 

This preparation can make a difference when students enter the field to pursue an entry-level position in the industry. Apex students get a total of 900 hours of theory and hands-on practice that they can use on the job. If you’re interested in how automotive service training can help you achieve your goals, learn more about our program today.

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

6 benefits of trade school

6 Benefits of Trade School

Considering trade school vs. college? Technical skills can offer career options and personal fulfillment, especially if you enjoy hands-on work. If you’re unsure how learning a trade can benefit you or fit into your schedule, explore the top reasons why students choose to enroll in trade school.

 

Classes are starting soon! Call us at 212-645-3300 to find out more.

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

 

Five types of electrical wiring pinned to a wall

Test Your Knowledge: Types of Electrical Wiring

When you open a service panel or look behind a light switch, you may see a tangle of cables or a neatly organized arrangement of home electrical wiring. Depending on your knowledge, your perspective changes! When you know a few basic things about residential electrical wiring, you can more confidently find problems and diagnose solutions.

Residential Electrical Questions

Whether you’re an electrical student who is already attending residential electrical wiring classes or you’re thinking about enrolling because you have an interest in the trade, it’s always a good time to test your knowledge and learn something new! Explore the residential electrical questions below to find out how much you know about identifying and understanding the different types of electrical wiring.

 

Related: Residential Electrical FAQs
An electrician repairs home electrical wiring behind a light switch

What is residential electrical wiring vs. cable?

Electrical wire is a material that conducts electricity, and it is usually made of copper or aluminum. Most residential wires are wrapped in a nonconductive plastic coating. The plastic coating is sometimes called a jacket. A combination of two or more wires is called a cable. These are also wrapped inside a jacket to insulate the wires from touching other objects.

How do you read labels on electrical wiring?

The jacket, or insulation on an electrical wire is stamped with a code. This special code tells you what type of electrical wiring it is, as well as characteristics about its performance. THHN and THWN are the most common types of electrical wire used in residential construction. These letters stand for:

  • T: Thermoplastic, a heat-resistant plastic
  • H: Heat-resistant up to 167F
  • HH: Heat-resistant up to 194F
  • W: Moisture-resistant
  • N: Nylon-coated to resist damage from oil and gasoline

Nonmetallic cables also have codes and lettering on them, indicating the number and size of wires inside the jacket, or plastic coating. Common labels on nonmetallic cables include:

  • Nonmetallic Sheathed Cable (NM-B): Standard for dry indoor locations
  • Underground Feeder (UF): Suitable for outdoors and in-ground
  • Service Entrance (SE): Suitable for above-ground appliances and bringing power from a transformer to a house
  • Underground Service Entrance cable (USE): Suitable for outdoors and in-ground, similar to SE cables

Finally, the numbers on a nonmetallic cable tell you about the wiring size and number of wires inside the jacket. For example, a jacket with “12/2” contains two 12-gauge insulated wires.
Color coded residential electrical wiring

What is cable jacket color coding?

In addition to lettering and numbering, electrical wiring and jackets come in different colors to indicate how to use them. Color coding is a valuable tool in the electrical trade because it makes wires easily identifiable and promotes safer jobsites.

Hot

  • Black
  • Red

Sometimes Hot

  • Blue
  • Yellow

Neutral

  • White
  • Gray

Ground

  • Green
  • Bare copper

Residential Electrical Wiring Classes

Now that you’ve learned more about residential electrical wiring, take your curiosity further. Check out our Electrical and Advanced Electrical program page, and find out if electrical classes are a good fit for your goals. Have questions? Contact Apex to learn more.

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

A person interviewing for a skilled trade job

Interviewing for a Skilled Trade Job? Practice These Questions

Heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) technicians often enjoy a rewarding and hands-on trade. These technicians require practical skills, problem-solving abilities and a passion for technical knowledge about heating, A/C and refrigeration equipment.

Individuals working in this trade should also understand HVAC safety standards. Whether you’re an HVAC student starting training classes, or you’ve been working in the field for years, you can find ways to protect yourself and others from potential hazards. Here are some HVAC safety tips to improve day-to-day operations:

What do you enjoy most about your line of work?

Hiring managers want to know about you and your technical skills and professional work habits. It’s a good idea to provide an answer that shows you have hands-on training. Instead of talking about how you will enjoy the company truck or the flexibility to set your own hours, you may consider discussing topics like working with your hands, solving problems and feeling accomplished that you completed the job on time and on budget.

How did you handle a disagreement at old job?

A trades student learning how to prepare for a job interviewThe interviewer is looking for evidence that you are a self-starter who can make decisions independently but who can also solve problems when they arise. Talk about a time when you and a coworker or customer disagreed about something. Maybe the customer wanted something that was unsafe or not permitted at your place of employment. Discuss how you listened to them patiently and worked to remedy the situation while ensuring no rules or safety measures were broken.

If you can’t think of an example from a job on your resume, you could also give an example of a disagreement you had in trade school. Think back to shop and theory classes—did you know you had the right answer, but a classmate insisted his answer was right instead? Maybe you found out your answer or technique was wrong. Tell the hiring manager how that impacted you, what you learned and how you approach this technique now.

Why do you want to work here?

Two people shake hands after asking job interview questions

While this question may seem easy on the surface, it requires some thought. People need jobs to make money to support themselves and their family—that much is true. However, if a hiring manager asks you this question, that’s not the answer they are looking for. Instead, they want to know why you think you’re the best fit for their specific company.

To answer this question, prepare an answer by completing some research. Before your interview, visit the company’s website. Read about what the company mission—do you believe in that too? Why? Explore their services and offerings. How do those align with your own skills and abilities? Be able to explain why you think this company is the best place for you.

Find Job Placement Assistance at Apex Technical School

Why do students choose Apex? Students say our job placement assistance is one reason. We provide support to students during training and upon program completion. Learn more about how we offer job placement assistance to Apex students by contacting us today.

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

An A/C and Refrigeration Program student checks circuits with digital multimeter

Do You Know HVAC Safety?

Heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) technicians often enjoy a rewarding and hands-on trade. These technicians require practical skills, problem-solving abilities and a passion for technical knowledge about heating, A/C and refrigeration equipment.

Individuals working in this trade should also understand HVAC safety standards. Whether you’re an HVAC student starting training classes, or you’ve been working in the field for years, you can find ways to protect yourself and others from potential hazards. Here are some HVAC safety tips to improve day-to-day operations:

1. Assess the situation

An individual uses HVAC tech service tools, a mobile phone, and a mask on the job
When an HVAC technician arrives at a jobsite, he or she should look around to understand the environment. Where is the HVAC equipment located? How many exits are there? What potential accidents or hazards might be present? Every jobsite is unique, and it’s crucial to evaluate the scene before getting to work. By pausing to reflect on the work setting, HVAC technicians give themselves valuable time to remember HVAC safety tips and act on them.

2. Wear safety gear

In addition to assessing the workspace, HVAC technicians should also ensure that they protect their body from potential accidents, chemical spills, electrical hazards and falls. Some individuals in the HVAC trade wear durable clothes to ensure the skin on their arms and legs doesn’t come into contact with sharp metal edges on air conditioners, heating systems or ventilation shafts. Gloves, protective eyewear and masks can also help increase safety for HVAC workers.

 

Related: Questions Homeowners Ask About HVAC Systems

3. Handle equipment properly

An HVAC technician follows HVAC safety tips on the job

While assessing a job, HVAC technicians can determine what types of heating or cooling appliances are present and what tools or equipment they need to inspect and repair issues. Therefore, knowledge about trade tools is key. In combination with HVAC history and theory, individuals learn hands-on skills in trade school, where they have the opportunity to handle HVAC service tech tools in a shop setting with experienced instructors. This is valuable training for entry-level employment and can go a long way in maintaining HVAC safety standards in the field.

Learn HVAC Safety in Trade School

Do you have a passion for working with your hands? If you enjoy problem-solving and have an interest in heating and cooling repair, learn more about the A/C Refrigeration Program at Apex Technical School. Classes are starting soon, and our Admissions team is scheduling appointments to help answer your questions.

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

Students learn about the benefits of trade school in class

Are Trade Schools Worth It?

When trying to determine the next step on your educational or career path, it can be difficult to make a decision that feels right. You might have many questions and few answers. If you’re considering trade school, one of the main questions on your mind is likely, “Is trade school worth it?” To help you find more information to make this decision, we’ve compiled a few reasons why students say they choose to attend trade school.

3 Benefits of Trade School

Trade school can provide valuable benefits for students from a variety of backgrounds and situations. For example, trade school students may be recent high school graduates, single parents, part-time workers, or full-time working individuals who want to go back to school to start a new career path. Whatever your situation or circumstance, you may find that trade school is a good fit for you. Here are a few reasons to think seriously about enrolling in trade school.

Shorter Time to Learn

An automotive trade student knows the benefits of vocational school
Compared to a traditional four-year college experience or two-year community college experience, it takes less time to learn skills at trade school. For example, at Apex Technical School, students can complete their program in as little as seven months. Some students prefer to spend a shorter amount of time in school so they can more quickly enter their field of choice.

 

Related: How Long Is Trade School?

Hands-on Training

A welding shop where students learn hands-on skills at ApexHands-on training is one of the best ways to learn trade skills. By learning how to do trade techniques yourself—instead of simply hearing about them—you are more likely to remember information to use later at a job. Trade school provides students with valuable hands-on opportunities to work in the shop setting and use tools of the trade. Students enjoy studying this knowledge at trade school because they often feel more prepared once they step into the field.

Learn About Theory and Safety

Theory is the “why” behind an approach or idea. In addition to hands-on skills, trade schools like Apex Technical School teach trade theory so students understand why they learn about certain topics or techniques. Theory is grounded in the history of a trade. For example, the history of plumbing goes back thousands of years, and some old ideas are still important to the field today. In addition to theory and history, students at trade school also benefit from learning trade safety. Depending on which program you take, safety procedures may differ. Welding safety gear and guidelines may be different from those in construction—but all safety measures are always important at school and in your career.

Explore Trade School Programs at Apex

Now that you know more about the benefits of vocational school, see if Apex has a program that’s right for you. With several programs to choose from, you may find a path you’re interested in by browsing our programs. Have questions? We’re happy to talk to you. Contact us and we’ll be in touch soon.

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

A tablet lies on a wooden workbench with other construction tools used in construction trade school

Benefits of Construction Technology

Advancements in new technology drive the construction industry forward. When you hear “construction technology,” what comes to mind first? Some think about robots that perform human tasks or super computers that manage large amounts of worksite data. However, technology is more than innovative equipment that can accomplish tasks for you. It includes software and machinery—and more traditional devices such as power tools and hand tools.

How Is Technology Used in Construction?

From trade school students to senior management on a construction jobsite, technology can influence productivity, safety and collaboration. Learn more about how technology in the construction industry can help some workers be more efficient.

1. Productivity

Every construction site is different with unique opportunities and challenges. Technology can make it easier for jobsite managers or foremen to streamline processes. With streamlined processes, planning becomes easier. Plus, productivity can increase because workers have clear expectations. Managers can use certain software to manage projects, from scheduling to reporting and more. Mobile apps can help individuals in the construction trade access timecards and work records.

 

Related: 5 Signs a Construction Career Path is Right for You

2. Safety and Training

A construction worker flies a drone on a worksiteSome construction sites implement new technology to improve safety on the job or to enhance onboarding and training. Worker training is important to keep everyone safe, whether workers are using their carpentry skills to build a residential home or operating equipment for a commercial construction project. Training can include learning how to use devices, such as wearable technology, to improve worker safety.

Wearable tech can be added to hard hats, vests and work boots to monitor workers’ health through sensors or their location with GPS. Wearables may also give workers access to a Wi-Fi hotspot, enabling them to sign online to review project details. Some construction projects are increasingly using drones to take aerial photos of a project in progress, conduct inspections or identify risks before a hazard occurs.

3. Collaboration

A construction trade school student learns how to use a table sawOn a large or noisy construction site, flexibility is key. Workers may be required to complete solo tasks, then help other crew members finish a related assignment. This type of environment needs collaboration and clear communication to function smoothly. Smartphones and tablets make communication easier and faster. They also enable workers to answer calls, check in on the go and resolve issues quickly.

While devices with screens can make construction work more efficient, it’s important to remember that practical skills and basic tools still power the average worksite. That’s why trade schools like Apex provide valuable, hands-on learning with fundamental tools such as:

  • Hammers and nail pullers
  • Screwdrivers and drills
  • Measuring tapes, rulers and levels
  • Framing squares and speed squares
  • Table saws, chop saws, circular saws and hand saws
  • Chisels and tile cutters

Knowing how to use basic tools of the trade has a huge impact on jobsite productivity and collaboration. You can work smarter when your whole crew has the skills to use tools efficiently.

Learn More About Construction Trade School

Technology can impact a variety of construction processes. Some worksites may use a combination of new technology and traditional technology, such as power tools and hand tools. At Apex, our instructors teach how to use common tools of the trade. Visit our programs page to find out more about the Construction and Building Skills Program at Apex.

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

Windows at Apex Technical School building in New York

How to Get into Trade School

Is it hard to get into trade school in New York? How do I know if I’m qualified to enroll? How quickly can I finish trade school compared to a traditional four-year college? These are common questions the staff at Apex receive every day. We help individuals who are interested in learning more about trade school find the answers they need and enroll at our school if it’s a good fit. Find out more about the requirements for trade school below.

Vocational School Requirements for Enrollment

Vocational school at Apex Technical School buildingApex has four main requirements for trade school, which include:

  1. You must be at least 18 years of age. We also accept students who are 17 years of age with parental consent. You may be enrolled if you are 16 1/2 years old and have a release letter from your New York State high school.
  2. If you do not have a high school diploma or a GED, you must achieve a satisfactory score on a standardized examination.
  3. You will have an interview with an Admissions Representative at the school to see if Apex is right for you.
  4. You will be given information on the cost of attendance and financial assistance you may be eligible for. After careful consideration and you determine that Apex is right for you, you will sign an enrollment agreement and pay an application fee.

To learn more about the standardized examination, please contact us. We are happy to answer all your questions and want to make sure you get the information you need to make an informed decision about attending trade school. To learn more about transfer hours, visit our Admissions page.

Trade School Program Requirements

When you enroll in one of our seven programs, you’ll get the opportunity to split your time between the classroom and the shop. One of the benefits of trade school at Apex is the 900 hours of instruction and hands-on training students complete before finishing their program. Programs can be completed in as little as seven months.

Our trade programs include:

Is Financial Aid for Trade School Available?

A plumbing student repairs a pipe with a wrenchSome students are interested in financial aid for trade school. Financial assistance can vary from person to person. When you contact our school, you will receive information on the cost of attendance and financial assistance you may be eligible for. If you determine that Apex is right for you, you will sign an enrollment agreement and pay an application fee. You will also learn when your classes start and any other course requirements, such as tools you may receive.

Interested in learning more about enrolling at Apex? Contact us today online or by calling 212-645-3300.

 

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

Apex Technical School plumbing classroom with desks and tools

The Benefits of Going to Trade School for Plumbing

At our trade school for plumbing, students get entry-level skills and hands-on training they can use on their career path. Learn about three plumbing school benefits that can help equip you to enter the plumbing field.

A Variety of Skills and Locations

A graduate of a trade school for plumbing fixes a sink in a residential homeStudents who go to trade school for plumbing can look forward to learning a variety of skills and using tools to maintain and repair different fixtures. In addition to toilets, plumbing students enrolled in trade school practice working with:

  • Sinks
  • Pipes
  • Water heaters
  • Water supply systems
  • Valves and faucets
  • And much more

Once they enter their career field, some plumbers may work in residential homes, while others may work in commercial buildings. Like an electrical career path, plumbing gives you the chance to experience different settings—maybe a dozen or more in a regular work week. If you’re someone who likes different work environments, plumbing school may be the path for you.

Plumbing School Can Lead to Independence

Do you have family obligations or want scheduling flexibility when it comes to your future career path? Plumbing school can provide the entry-level skills to pursue a career path like plumbing, where some workers have the opportunity to work alone if they so choose. Plumbers who go into business for themselves can set their own hours, which gives them more independence to balance personal responsibilities with their work schedule.

Related: Plumbing and Pipefitting Training: A Day in the Life at Apex

Hands-on Work vs. Sitting at a Desk

A plumbing student repairs a pipe with a wrenchAt a trade school like Apex, we provide plumbing students with instruction that is split between the classroom and the shop. We understand that most plumbers aren’t stuck in an office at a desk all day—instead, they spend their days moving, lifting, repairing and interacting with customers. Many of our students find value in hands-on training in our shop, where they can use plumbing tools, put theory into practice, and work alongside peers and instructors.

Plumbing School Benefits

For many individuals working in the plumbing field, their own trade school experience offered new perspectives and opportunities to learn skills for working in an exciting industry. As you think about whether you have a future in the plumbing industry, keep these top plumbing school benefits in mind:

  • Hands-on training
  • Skills for an entry-level position
  • Opportunity to learn about and handle a variety of fixtures and tools
  • Potential to work on the job, not behind a desk

Apex offers our Plumbing and Pipefitting program, which includes six segments that teach basic plumbing safety, plumbing history, pipe systems, plumbing tools and much more. Find out more about the program now or contact us to get answers to your questions.

 

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.

A person wears safety gear for students at Apex Technical School

Types of Welding Protective Gear

Protection is one of the first things individuals in the welding industry learn about their trade. Welding protective gear can help keep the skin, eyes, hair and face safe from the task at hand. At Apex, we require safety gear for welding students in the shop, where students engage in hands-on learning with welding tools and equipment. Keep reading to learn about the types of PPE required for welding—from professional welding helmets to protective hand gloves and more.

PPE Required for Welding

Welding requires personal protective equipment (PPE) to keep the welder safe from hot metal, bright light and UV radiation. Different types of welding may call for various types of gear. Common types of welding protective gear found in the industry include:

  • Welding helmets
  • Goggles
  • Respirators
  • Fire/flame resistant jackets or aprons
  • Ear plugs
  • Gloves

Why Is Eye Protection Important in Welding?

A professional welding helmet with protective hand gloves Welding protective gear for the eyes helps shield against ultraviolet radiation, flying particles, debris, sparks, intense light, irritation and chemical burns. Eye injuries can occur from bright welding light; therefore, welders should wear helmets fitted with a shade appropriate for the type of welding they are doing.

If a welder is not wearing a welding helmet with an eye shield, he or she should wear safety goggles with side protection to prevent particles and debris from entering the goggles and damaging the eyes.

 

 

Using Protective Hand Gloves for the Skin

A pair of welder's protective hand gloves on a workbenchInsulated gloves protect against electric shock, heat, burns and fires. Protect the wrists and forearms by wearing cuff-style leather gloves with protective sleeves. When kept dry, leather is a good electrical insulator. Gloves also protect the skin against ultraviolet radiation while allowing range of motion and an enhanced grip. According to Engineering 360, three common types of protective hand gloves include:

  • TIG welding gloves – Designed to provide adequate protection and finger sensitivity. Made of goat, cow, or pig hides.
  • MIG welding gloves – Designed to provide maximum protection with some dexterity. Made of pig, cow, or deer hides.
  • Stick welding gloves – Designed to provide the most robust protection. Made of cow or elk hides.

Related: Common Welding Types

Tips for Wearing Protective Clothing

All clothing types aren’t suitable for welding. It’s best to wear clothing made from heavy-weight wool or cotton to protect against ultraviolet radiation and flames. Make sure clothes don’t come into contact with oils or gasoline, as these are combustible and can catch fire easily. Wear high boots to protect the legs, ankles and feet from hot metal sparks.

Do not wear:

  • Jewelry
  • Synthetic materials
  • Torn or frayed clothing
  • Broken or damaged helmet lenses

Learn more about the Combination Welding Technology Program at Apex Technical School by visiting our program page or by contacting us today.

 

 

 

*Apex Technical School and its instructors are licensed by the State of New York, New York State Education Department.

Disclaimer: Apex Technical School provides training for entry-level jobs. Not everything you may read about the industry is covered in our training programs.